Sin of a Woman. Kimberla Lawson Roby. 2017. 320 pages. Grand Central Publishing. [Source: ARC provided courtesy of NetGalley.] Without question, Kimberla Lawson Roby’s Curtis Black series books are always masterfully written in comparison to her other works. Unfortunately, Sin of a Woman failed to reach the relatively high bar. It’s intriguing that she elected to almost duplicate the plot of the most recent saga of Dillon Black wit...

One Night. Eric Jerome Dickey. 2015. 370 pages. Dutton. [Source: public library.] I consider myself an Eric Jerome Dickey fan that’s fallen off the wagon.  I began reading his novels in my early 20s, and after I read Chasing Destiny, Genevieve, and Pleasure, he could do no wrong in my eyes. I’ve since expanded what I read, so it’s been a few years since I checked for him.  I was surfing my public library’s audiobooks wh...

Sold:! J.L. Campbell. 2016. 161 pages. The Writers’ Suite. [Source: Kindle Unlimited.] I was drawn to this book more because of a profile about its author than the plot itself. I wanted to check out J.L. Campbell, and the description for Sold! seemed appealing as an entry into her works.  This isn’t a bad book by any means, but it isn’t something I feel is a necessary read. Sold! features Feechi, a single mom whose sense of s...

Please Come Home for Christmas. Kahillah Fox. 2016. 65 pages. HeartBeat Press. [Source: Kindle Unlimited.] So, I love all things Christmas. Sure, I grumble about the cold, the stress of decorating and gift buying, and dinner planning.  But I also permanently change my radio station to 97.1fm the day after Thanksgiving because that’s when the Christmas music starts. So when I came across Please Come Home For Christmas last night on Kindle...

The Couple Next Door. Shari Lapena. 2016. 320 pages. Pamela Dorman Books. [Source: ARC provided courtesy of NetGalley.] Like playing a game of Clue, minus the board, the players, and the hope that when it gets to the end it’ll make sense … Ironically, the book reminded me of a notable case from Colorado where nothing makes sense and there’s a bunch of missing pieces to even the most trained eye. However, the mystery and crazy...

Back again!
Not the Review / March 24, 2017

Hey there readers! You may notice that Words on Words is lacking a little something … reviews!  I had a snafu with hosting, so I lost everything! All of my reviews for the past FOUR years … gone overnight. I went through all of the feelings when I realized the posts were gone, never to return: I’m talking Five Stages of Grief, y’all. Finally, acceptance hit. I would have to start afresh. But it’s cool. I...

A Second Helping: A Blessings Novel

With each book I’m more impressed with the author. Once again sucked in and invested in the characters. I love how she keeps the town and the every dynamic involved. With newly arriving figures in the story, she managed to intertwine them in a manner that didn’t make you feel as though they took away from the others. So excited for part 3 – what’s on the horizon for Trent & Lily? Malachi and Bernadine? And...

The Queen of the Frogs

  The Queen of the Frogs. David Cali & Marco Soma, ill. 2017. 38 pages. Eerdmans Books for Young Readers. [Source: ARC provided courtesy of NetGalley.]   Today is release day for The Queen of the Frogs, a hilarious story with a moral that everyone can relate to. The story is set at a pond with a community of frogs, flies, and dragonflies. One day, a shiny gold object drops into the pond – the frogs aren’t quite sure what it is, b...

The Loud House #1

The Loud House # 1: There Will Be Chaos. Chris Savino. 2017. 64 pages. Papercutz Books. [Source: ARC provided courtesy of NetGalley.] The Loud House is no stranger to my household, so it was a must that we check out its first graphic novel. I was pleasantly surprised to find that this graphic novel is more like an anthology, with the stories focusing on a different child of the Loud household. Admittedly, the idea of a house filled w...

Orange is the New Black
Memoir , Non-fiction / March 19, 2017

Orange is the New Black. Piper Kerman. 2010. 322 pages. Spiegel and Grau. [Source: personal copy.] I’m not a fan of memoirs, which trumps whether this was good or not, because it was a self inflicted torture. Her account was realistic, honest and enlightening but extremely boring at times. I’ve never had to use the dictionary so many times when reading a book and wonder if this is her everyday vocabulary or if she became ...